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20130201
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Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)
, drones can be more useful in that kind of environment. our allies seem to want to take the lead. but we're going to have to be much more supportive than we're now willing to be in that area. and we're going to have to think hard about other places like syria. >> right. >> where there's, you know, a massive loss of life, 60,000 already. and we're hanging back there. again, i think out of reluctance to get too involved because of the slippery slope that in the end will have to be militarily involved and the people and the president have better things to do. >> a piece in "the wall street journal" this week saying basically there's too much reaction to iraq and inaction here he compares to the first president bush not doing anything about the shiite uprising in iraq in 1991, which he argued led ultimately to the second gulf war. i think that may be an area where people would debate, but what are the consequences of the u.s. hanging back in syria? >> well, if we hang back in syria, there could be a dissent into chaos. it's already headed in that direction. again, the rise of these islamic j
creates an environment because of their living conditions that is not conducive to readiness. >> chris: colonel mcsally, those are the two basic arguments. you are a combat pilot but you are not formally, not in combat on the front lines, you are attached to combat units and the two arguments are, one, physical limitations, particularly to serving in the infantry and also the question of a distraction during operations, when you are in close quarters, there is no privacy and rugged living conditions and look in your camera and tell general boykin why he's wrong. >> let me just say i realize flying combat aircraft and being on the ground in combat are two very different missions, hover the same flawed arguments were used against allowing women to fly in combat and now allowing them to be on ground combat. like the general said these are flawed arguments the battle line is we need to treat people like individuals. what are the capabilities they bring to the fight. which includes physical strength, plus courage, plus aptitude and leadership and, all the other things we need to have the mo
in high threat environment. how to get out beyond the walls of our facilities. how do we remain successful in the private sector while still securing our embassies and protecting our people in these environments? the review board correctly points out the department has been resource-challenge for many years. this has constrained our mission, and restricting the use of resources even for security has become a conditioned response. decisions about the security resources being made more on costs than value. the approach fails to recognize the diplomacy and foreign aid put down payments in terms of good will, open borders for the export of american products, protection of intellectual property, and cooperation on security and counterterrorism. there is a lot to discuss. welcome again. we appreciate your time. on a personal note, since this is likely to be your last hearing before this committee and your leadership will be missed, i speak for many when i say you have been an outstanding secretary of state, you have changed the face of america abroad, and extended the house killed the bill -- ho
its employees. many of whom served in hostile environments. unfortunately, threats to americans abroad are growing particularly those threats are growing in north africa and the attacks last week in algeria again show the nature of the danger. i support having a wide diplomatic presence. we can't retreat. as you for recognizing your testimony. but it has to be done with the safety of our personnel foremost in mind. this committee intends to work with your department in a bipartisan way. and to work to improve security. every organization has its shortcomings to review with welcome them being highlighted, but it's this committee's job to get answers to the tough questions. our goal is to identify where the state department management broke down, thus failing to protect our people than benghazi to it is clear the problem wasn't confined to a few individuals. the accountability review board convened by you, madam secretary, found a, quote, systemic failures and leadership and management deficiencies at sea levels within two bureaus in the state department. according to the board, these sy
from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, our security at home is threatened. >> i thought that was such -- that's hillary clinton testifying this week and i thought that line was so important because it kind of disstills down i think the operational theory in intervention here or american leadership, which is when america is absent, especially from unstable environments, there are consequences. extremism takes root, our interests suffer, security at home is threatened. horace, that seems like a proposition you don't agree with and libya was a failed implementation of that view. >> first of all, hillary clinton has a very short memory, so the kind of leadership she's talking about, we have to be very clear, what kind of leadership we want in africa. the people in africa want peace. they want unity and they want reconstruction. they do not want wars. and what happened in libya is a sign of the kind of militarism we've seen all over africa from the u.s. africa command. 50,000 libyans have been killed out of this intervention. the w
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
an environment where you have a chance to see whether the negotiations between the israelis and the palestinian authority lead somewhere. and maybe that begins to change circumstance but i d't think you can doore than that. >> it does concern me to watch the inaugural address-- as excited i was as a good liberal. i thought it was one of the most liberal inaugural speeches since 1937, the second inaugural of f.d.r., but it was basically a domestic speech. if there's one thing i know about barack obama, having written a biography of him and having some contact with him, the one thing he is cop standpointly asking about when it comes to israeli politics is who is my constituency? in other words, if i am going to spend political capital-- which i have a limited amount of for the collected number of issues i have to deal with for a certain period of time-- who am i appealing to? and that is something that came out ofeate election. it has to be a little more encouraging than it could have been. not enormously but under encouraging than if bennett had come in second or third and the likud list had tri
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
there aren't frontlines, and there are urban environments. she lived with other american soldiers. she lived in this same very dirty room that smelled of feet almost all the time. they got along very well. i can imagine if you multiply that throughout what they call theater of battle and you have women in these tiny frontline outposts across the country that it would be a major adjustment. they will be logistical things that they'll have to adjust to. not just latrines, but they'll have to have more sensitivity training because these outposts are very macho, very aggress he have kinds of places. it will be a big adjustments. >> but it's an adjustment that the women all welcome. there is a lot of support for this on capitol hill from both republicans and democrats because they all have constituents, and they all see that these women are blocked. they're barred from promotions, and they're suffering all of the trevail of combat or being in a war zone without having the benefits. >> and without having certain, as you say, career advancement. there is some pay implications as well. what i just w
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
to establish a psychology that in some cases led to that environment. i have to believe the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. >> reporter: the decision comes nearly two and a half years after the repeal of another ban "don't ask, don't tell" which barred gays and lesbians from openly serving in the military. >> ifill: for more on how this came together, and what comes >> brown: still to come on the newshour: confirmation hearings for secretary of state nominee john kerry ... china's growth bubble ... and an online "fireside chat" with vice president biden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: president obama announced his nominees today to run two key financial regulatory agencies. he tapped mary jo white to chair the securities and exchange commission. she's a former federal prosecutor in new york, with a long record of prosecuting financial fraud and other white- collar crimes. >> if confirmed by the senate, i look forward to committing all of my energies to working with my fellow commissioners a
that in some cases led to that environment. >> goldie, do you agree with that? >> absolutely have to agree with that. you know, the proliferation of military rapes, assaults on women, willed soldiers, women marines, women sailors are more likely to be sexual assaulted by their own brethren than they are the enemy. that's the plain fact of the matter and many of those cases are covered up. those women are sent home and those money are dent to duty station to duty station and their careers move on. it's been a long time since a woman joined the military. women have been fighting this good fight a very, very long time. there are relatives of mine, cousins and brothers, who are retired navy officers. they are retired air force. they served in the naef. i'm the only marine in the family. i think that says something about my mindset on this thing. my brother said that i was crazy. he's probably right about that. >> oh, you're not crazy, goldie. you're not crazy. >> i think it takes -- but i think that the criteria for me and the criteria for every woman and man who serves ought to be the same, a
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
certainly aware of the increasing threat environment. i not only was briefed on that, i testified to that effect. and there were constant evaluations going on. but no one, not the ambassador, security professionals, the intelligence community ever recommended closing that mission. and the reason they didn't was because the ongoing threat environment had up until the spring before our terrible attack in benghazi been a result of post-conflict conditions. that is something that we're familiar with all over the world. yes, there were some attacks, as you have said, but our evaluation of them and the recommendation by the security professionals was that those were all manageable because we had a lot of that around the world. i mean, there is a long list of attacks that have been foiled, assassination plots that have been prevented. so this is not some -- you know, one off event. this is considered in an atmosphere of a lot of threats and dangers. and at the end of the day, you know, there was a decision made that this would be evaluated but it would not be closed and, unfortunately, w
environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot about the campaign -- during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the president's message was the economy. >> the last question beca
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
more. you want to dress in layers and dress properly for the environment. >> is there a big difference in terms of elderly and young people in ways that tech really get sick and -- they can really get sick and suffer illness? >> definitely. older people have a decreased cold tolerance. they don't sense the cold as quickly as younger people do. plus they have other health concerns as well that affect their ability to be warm and to remain warm in cold climates. they also take a lot of medications which can decrease their ability to stay warm, so they're definitely a high risk category as well as infants. infants really can't tell you when they're cold, and they have a decreased ability to tolerate cold, cold temperatures, so it's important to check on both of those extremes. >> i know you brought some props in to show us what we can do to protect ourselves. >> i did. grandma already taught us this, but maintaining a good diet and staying healthy includes lots of fruits and vegetables. you need to drink a lot of water as well, and people say, oh, why do i need to drink water? your skin g
like he does will have to be more comfortable with that sport as it pushes toward a safer environment with less violence. we will witness what it look like a week from now. it is one topic the president was comfortable weighing in on. >> a couple of new insights from the president there. white house correspondent peter alexander, thank you so much. >>> new today, renewed fights over how to deal with the federal budget. dick durbin is defending what president obama said in his inauguration speech. >> what i heard the president say was programs like social security, medicare and medicaid, critically important for our future and we need to have a bipartisan commitment to make them work. bob and i have been in a lot of meetings talks about deficit reductions. i think we need reform in these programs that means they will live on to serve future generations. that's the message i took from the president. >> former republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan said the gop needs to recommend at this times approach with voters looking forward. >> we have to expand our appeal. we had to expan
of people raising it and how they are raising it given the environment we are in in the aftermath of a terrible tragedy. no gun laws have ever worked to accomplish that. some of the place necessary this country with the strictist gun laws have the most violence. let's have that debate, we are happy to point out that. bill: last week harry reid seemed to suggest that he did not want to put his senate democrats in an uncomfortable situation regarding a vote on gun control. there are 20 democratic senators up for re-election in 2014. is it your belief that he's trying to give them cover? >> well, i understand why, we -- by the way, the right to bear arms is not something we made up. it is a constitutional right and i hope that there are democrats that are uncomfortable about doing things that undermine that. it is a basic fundamental american rights, it's one of the unique rights we have compared to the rest of the world and it's one we won't give up easily i tell that you much. bill: thank you for your time. marco rubio the republican from florida. one of the reasons he was on with
are but a manifestation of the brilliance of nature to enable us to adapt to the environment in which we evolved, that somehow these characteristics determine our inate worth and value as human beings. that is the essence of racism. but that system was not cultivated into every intellectual commercial, judicial, religious philosophical medical system that we have. the imbalances you see in the country today -- i call them inequities' -- are but reflections of that deep-seated belief. is it a conscious in most of us? no. in some of us, ys. -- yes. i aniston the ku klux klan -- i understand the ku klux klan was going to have a rally. some people consciously adhere to that belief. but most of us have been swept up in it and we do not even know wit. it is easy to be at the top and never have to think about it. it is impossible to be on the bottom and not think about that on a daily basis and not internalize the absurdity of the devaluation of your humanity on a daily basis. my lovely daughter once said to me, "how did the story of african-americans get inverted into a story of victimization only?" "
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)